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This is my "welcome page" for Bergen County, NJ, where I lived for 40 years before relocating to Ringwood. I still consider Teaneck "my home". Sorry Ringwood! If you need assistance with your PC, Mac, router, or ANYTHING computer or network-related, I can get you running quickly because I live so close to you! As you can read below, I am a retired Systems Analyst from a major fortune 500 company (Xerox Corporation). And since I no longer have to travel into NYC (Ugh!) everyday, I would like to use my experience and skills locally. If you need a hand setting up your virtual office or need to extend your wireless capability to the backyard so you can stream the bears that visit us, I can make it happen.

Computer Support Bergen County

Below are the details of my services...

My name is Bill Sherwood. I have recently retired from 38 years of working in NYC for a corporate giant (Xerox). In my last role, which ran for 20 years, I was a Systems Analyst. My job was to connect our MFDs (Multi-Function Devices) to our customers' networks. I also provided IT consulting services, which included designing and creating new workflows for our customers. I was trusted to support some of our biggest and most important clients (Verizon, AECOM, NYPD, the National Football League, Major League Baseball, The National Hockey League, and just about all NYC Government and Federal Agencies located in NYC. That’s me in the picture at Met Life Stadium, where I provided support for the Superbowl. It doesn't get any bigger than that! At that event, my responsibilities were to receive the game stats quarter by quarter, and distrubute them to the huge media presence there. We did the same for post-game players' quotes. As for me, I have several Microsoft Server Certifications, in addition to Certifications with Apple and Novell. I now work independantly, primarily around North Jersey, but I do sometimes travel to other locations including Rockland County, NY, and of course, Manhattan NYC, where I just retired from. For most of my regular customers, I have setup remote repair capability. With that, I can fix most issues without a site visit. However, first time clients require a site visit. I need to get paid for my work! And speaking of pay, since I am a one-man operation, my overhead is quite low. Therefore, I can offer you my services for a fraction of what most others charge for IT repair in NJ. Below is a small sample of what I provide.

Bergen County Info...

Bergen County, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Bergen County, New Jersey
County of New Jersey
County of Bergen
Palisades Sill near Englewood Cliffs.jpg
The Hudson River, seen southward below an overlook on the Palisades
Flag of Bergen County, New Jersey
Flag
Seal of Bergen County, New Jersey
Seal
Map of New Jersey highlighting Bergen County
Location in the U.S. state of New Jersey
Map of the United States highlighting New Jersey
New Jersey's location in the U.S.
40.96°N 74.07°WCoordinates40.96°N 74.07°W
Founded 1683
Named for Bergen, Norway or Bergen, North Holland[1]
Government
• County executive

James J. Tedesco III (D, term ends December 31, 2018)
Seat Hackensack[2]
Largest municipality Hackensack (population)
Mahwah (area)
Area
 • Total 246.671 sq mi (638.875 km2)
 • Land 233.009 sq mi (603.490 km2)
 • Water 13.662 sq mi (35.385 km2), 5.54%
Population
 • (2010) 905,116[3]
948,406 (2017 est.)[3][4] (1st in state)
 • Density 4,027.8/sq mi (1,555.1/km2)
Demonym(s) Bergenite[5]
Congressional districts 5th8th9th
Time zone EasternUTC−5/−4
Website www.co.bergen.nj.us
Footnotes:
Range in altitude:
Highest elevation: 1,152 ft/351 m (Bald Mountain, in theRamapo Mountains, in Mahwah).
Lowest elevation: 0 ft/0 m (sea level), at the Hudson River.

Bergen County is the most populous county in the U.S. state of New Jersey.[4] As of the 2017 Census estimate, the county's population was 948,406, an increase of 4.8% from the 2010 United States Census,[3][6][7] which in turn represented an increase of 20,998 (2.4%) from the 884,118 counted in the 2000 Census.[8] Located in the northeastern corner of New Jersey and its Gateway Region, Bergen County is part of the New York City Metropolitan Area and is directly across the Hudson River from Manhattan, to which it is connected by the George Washington Bridge.

Bergen County is divided into 70 municipalities, but has no large cities. Its most populous place, with 43,010 residents at the time of the 2010 census, is Hackensack,[9] which is also its county seat.[2] Mahwah covered the largest area of any municipality, at 26.19 square miles (67.8 km2).[9]

In 2015, the county had a per capita personal income of $75,849, the fourth-highest in New Jersey and ranked 45th of 3,113 counties in the United States.[10][11]Bergen County is one of the wealthiest counties in the United States, with a median household income of $81,708 per the 2010 Census, increasing to an estimated $84,677 in 2014, which was almost 18% higher than the $71,919 median statewide.[12] The county hosts an extensive park system totaling nearly 9,000 acres (3,600 ha).[13]

Etymology[edit]

The origin of the name of Bergen County is a matter of debate. It is believed that the county is named for one of the earliest settlements, Bergen, in modern-day Hudson County. However, the origin of the township's name is debated. Several sources attribute the name to Bergen, Norway, while others attribute it to Bergen, North Holland in the Netherlands.[1] Some sources say that the name is derived from one of the earliest settlers of New Amsterdam (now New York City), Hans Hansen Bergen, a native of Norway, who arrived in New Netherland in 1633.[14][15]

History[edit]

Bergen and Passaic counties, 1872.
Bergen County, 1896.
Bergen County, 1918.
The Atwood-Blauvelt Mansion in Oradell, circa 1909.

At the time of first European contact, Bergen County was inhabited by Native American people, particularly the Lenape Nation, whose sub-groups included the TappanHackensack, and Rumachenanck (later called the Haverstraw), as named by the Dutch colonists.[16] Some of their descendants are included among the Ramapough Mountain Indians, recognized as a tribe by the state in 1980.[17] Their ancestors had moved into the mountains to escape encroachment by Dutch and English colonists. Their descendants reside mostly in the northwest of the county, in nearby Passaic County and in Rockland County, New York, tracing their Lenape ancestry to speakers of the Munsee language, one of three major dialects of their language.[18] Over the years, they absorbed other ethnicities by intermarriage.[19]

In the 17th century, the Dutch considered the area comprising today's Bergen and Hudson counties as part of New Netherland, their colonial province of the Dutch Republic. The Dutch claimed it after Henry Hudson (sailing for the Dutch East India Company) explored Newark Bay and anchored his ship at Weehawken Cove in 1609.[20] From an early date, the Dutch began to import African slaves to fill their labor needs. Bergen County eventually was the largest slaveholding county in the state.[21] The African slaves were used for labor at the ports to support shipping, as well as for domestic servants, trades, and farm labor.

Early settlement attempts by the Dutch included Pavonia (1633), Vriessendael (1640), and Achter Col (1642), but the Native Americans repelled these settlements in Kieft's War (1643–1645) and the Peach Tree War (1655–1660).[22][23] European settlers returned to the western shores of the Hudson River in the 1660 formation of Bergen Township, which would become the first permanent European settlement in the territory of present-day New Jersey.[24][25]

During the Second Anglo-Dutch War, on August 27, 1664, New Amsterdam's governor Peter Stuyvesant surrendered to the English Navy.[26] The English organized the Province of New Jersey in 1665, later splitting the territory into East Jersey and West Jersey in 1674. On November 30, 1675, the settlement Bergen and surrounding plantations and settlements were called Bergen County in an act passed by the province's General Assembly.[27] In 1683, Bergen (along with the three other original counties of East Jersey) was officially recognized as an independent county by the Provincial Assembly.[28][29]

Initially, Bergen County consisted of only the land between the Hudson River and the Hackensack River, extending north to the border between East Jersey and New York.[30] In January 1709, the boundaries were extended to include all of the current territory of Hudson County (formed in 1840) and portions of the current territory of Passaic County (formed in 1837). The 1709 borders were described as follows:[30]

"Beginning at Constable's Hook, so along the bay and Hudson's River to the partition point between New Jersey and the province of New York; along this line and the line between East and West Jersey† to the Pequaneck River; down the Pequaneck and Passaic Rivers to the sound; and so following the sound to Constable's Hook the place of beginning."
† The line between East and West Jersey here referred to is not the line finally adopted and known as the Lawrence line, which was run by John Lawrence in September and October 1743. It was the compromise line agreed upon between Governors Daniel Coxe and Robert Barclay in 1682, which ran a little north of Morristown to the Passaic River; thence up the Pequaneck to forty-one degrees of north latitude; and thence by a straight line due east to the New York State line. This line being afterward objected to by the East Jersey proprietors, the latter procured the running of the Lawrence line.[30]

Bergen was the location of several battles and troop movements during the American Revolutionary WarFort Lee's location on the bluffs of the New Jersey Palisades, opposite Fort Washington in Manhattan, made it a strategic position during the war. In November 1776, the Battle of Fort Lee took place as part of a British plan to capture George Washington and to crush the Continental Army, whose forces were divided and located in Fort Lee and Hackensack. After abandoning the defenses in Fort Lee and leaving behind considerable supplies, the Continental forces staged a hasty retreat through present-day EnglewoodTeaneck, and Bergenfield, and across the Hackensack River at New Bridge Landing, one of the few sites where the river was crossed by a bridge. They destroyed the bridge to delay the British assault on Washington's headquarters in village of Hackensack. The next day, George Washington retreated to Newark and left Hackensack via Polifly Road. British forces pursued, and Washington continued to retreat across New Jersey. The retreat allowed American forces to escape capture and regroup for subsequent successes against the British elsewhere in New Jersey later that winter.[31] Soon after the Battle of Princeton in January 1777, British forces realized that they couldn't spread themselves thin across New Jersey. Local militia retook Hackensack and the rest of Bergen County. Bergen County saw skirmishes throughout the war as armies from both sides maneuvered across the countryside.

The Baylor Massacre took place in 1778 in River Vale, resulting in severe losses for the Continentals.[32]

In 1837, Passaic County was formed from parts of Bergen and Essex counties. In 1840, Hudson County was formed from Bergen. These two divisions took roughly 13,000 residents (nearly half of the previous population) from the county's rolls.[33]

In 1852, the Erie Railroad began operating major rail services from Jersey City on the Hudson River to points north and west via leased right-of-way in the county. This became known as the Erie Main Line, and is still in use for passenger service today.[34] The Erie later leased two other railroads built in the 1850s and 1860s, later known as the Pascack Valley Line and the Northern Branch, and in 1881 built a cutoff, now the Bergen County Line. There were two other rail lines in the county, ultimately known as the West Shore Railroad and the New York, Susquehanna, and Western.

In 1894, state law was changed to allow easy formation of municipalities with the Borough form of government. This led to the "boroughitis" phenomenon, in which many new municipalities were created in a span of a few years.[35] There were 26 boroughs that were formed in the county in 1894 alone, with two more boroughs (and one new township) formed in 1895.[36]

On January 11, 1917, the Kingsland Explosion took place at a munitions factory in what is today Lyndhurst.[37] The explosion is believed to have been an act of sabotage by German agents, as the munitions in question were destined for Russia, part of the U.S.'s effort to supply allies before entrance into World War I.[38] After the U.S. entry into the war in April 1917, Camp Merritt was created in eastern Bergen County for troop staging. Beginning operations in August 1917, it housed 50,000 soldiers at a time, staging them for deployment to Europe via Hoboken. Camp Merritt was decommissioned in November 1919.[39]

The George Washington Bridge was completed in 1931, linking Fort Lee to Manhattan. This connection spurred rapid development in the post-World War II era, developing much of the county to suburbanlevels. Two lanes were added to the upper level in 1946 and a second deck of traffic on the bridge was completed in 1962, expanding its capacity to 14 lanes.[40]

In 1955, the United States Army created a Nike Missile station at Campgaw Mountain (in the west of the county) for the defense of the New York Metropolitan Area from strategic bombers. In 1959, the site was upgraded to house Nike-Hercules Missiles with increased range, speed, and payload characteristics. The missile site closed in June 1971.[41]

Geography[edit]

The Hackensack River and Passaic River watersheds.

Bergen County is located at the northeastern corner of the state of New Jersey and is bordered by Rockland County, New York to the north; by Manhattan and the Bronx in New York City, as well as by Westchester County, New York, across the Hudson River to the east; and within New Jersey, by Hudson County as well as a small border with Essex County to the south, and by Passaic County to the west.[42]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the county had a total area of 246.671 square miles (638.87 km2), of which 233.009 square miles (603.49 km2) (94.5%) was land and 13.662 square miles (35.38 km2) (5.5%) was water.[43]

Bergen County's highest elevation is Bald Mountain near the New York state line in Mahwah, at 1,164 feet (355 m) above sea level.[44][45] The county's lowest point is sea level, along the Hudson River, which in this region is a tidal estuary.

The sharp cliffs of the New Jersey Palisades lift much of the eastern boundary of the county up from the Hudson River. The relief becomes less pronounced across the middle section of the county, much of it being located in the Hackensack River valley or the Pascack Valley. In the northwestern portion of the county, Bergen County becomes hilly again and shares the Ramapo Mountains with Rockland County, New York.

The damming of the Hackensack River and a tributary, the Pascack Brook, produced three reservoirs in the county, Woodcliff Lake Reservoir (which impounds one billion gallons of water), Lake Tappan (3.5 billion gallons), and Oradell Reservoir, which allows United Water to provide drinking water to 750,000 residents of northern New Jersey, mostly in Bergen and Hudson counties.[46] The Hackensack River drains the eastern portion of the county through the New Jersey Meadowlands, a wetlands area in the southern portion of the county. The central portion is drained by the Saddle River and the western portion is drained by the Ramapo River. Both of these are tributaries of the Passaic River, which forms a section of the southwestern border of the county.

[show]
Places adjacent to Bergen County, New Jersey

Climate[edit]

Hackensack, New Jersey
Climate chart (explanation)
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
3.7
 
 
38
19
 
 
3.2
 
 
41
22
 
 
4.4
 
 
50
30
 
 
4.5
 
 
62
40
 
 
4.2
 
 
72
50
 
 
4.4
 
 
81
60
 
 
4.6
 
 
86
65
 
 
4.4
 
 
84
63
 
 
4.3
 
 
76
55
 
 
4.4
 
 
64
42
 
 
4
 
 
54
34
 
 
4
 
 
43
25
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[47]
[show]Metric conversion

Southeastern Bergen County lies at the edge of the humid subtropical climate zone according to the Köppen climate classification because its coldest month (January) averages above 26.6 °F / -3 °C.[48][49][50] In part due to Bergen's coastal location, its lower elevation, and the partial shielding of the county from colder air by the three ridges of the Watchung Mountains as well as by the higher Appalachians, the climate of Bergen County is milder than in New Jersey counties further inland such as Sussex County. Bergen County has a moderately sunny climate, averaging between 2,400 and 2,800 hours of sunshine annually.[51]

In recent years, average temperatures in the county seat of Hackensack have ranged from a low of 19 °F (−7 °C) in January to a high of 86 °F (30 °C) in July, although a record low of −15 °F (−26 °C) was recorded in February 1934 and a record high of 106 °F (41 °C) was recorded in July 1936. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 3.21 inches (82 mm) in February to 4.60 inches (117 mm) in July.[47]

 

 



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North Jersey Computer has been in business since 2003. We've been providing IT support in NJ since then with a focus on bringing IT support to small business and to people's homes. William R Sherwood II is the President and only employee. We thank you for your business.

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